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Gweneth Lloyd (1901-1993) and Betty Farrally (1915-1989)

Gweneth Lloyd and Betty Farrally arrived in Canada from England in 1938 with a solid foundation in the RAD syllabus. Lloyd had completed a diploma in physical education at Liverpool College. At her first teaching job, she was introduced to the methods of Irene Mawer (mime) and Ruby Ginner (Revived Greek Dance) during open classes taught by a graduate of the Ginner-Mawer school. Inspired, she enrolled in their London school in 1923 where she also took ballet. When she graduated in 1926, Lloyd and fellow teacher Doris McBride opened their own school in Leeds. Coincidentally, in 1933, when Alison Sutcliffe was attending summer training at the RAD, she also attended the annual congress of the Imperial Society of Teachers of Dancing where Lloyd and McBride gave Revived Greek Dance workshops for teachers. Just as it was for Cox-Scruton, Revived Greek Dance was an important part of Lloyd’s training and teaching, and its principles even found their way into her more modernist ballet works such as The Wise Virgins (1942).

Farrally attended Lloyd’s school in Leeds and also took her RAD exams passing her Elementary in 1935 and Intermediate in 1936. When Lloyd and Farrally arrived in Winnipeg, they used the RAD syllabus as the training foundation at their Canadian School of Ballet and for the ballet club they initiated – the future Royal Winnipeg Ballet. Lloyd received her RAD Advanced Teacher’s Certificate in the spring of 1948 and that summer, she was certified as Canada’s first RAD examiner. This achievement meant that Lloyd could conduct children’s exams annually while the more advanced major examinations continued to be held in alternating years by visiting examiners from the UK. Prior to 1949, exams were conducted by visiting examiners who came for months-long tours visiting Canada’s major centres. Students in smaller communities often had to travel great distances to take their RAD exams.